Rebel Belle by Rachel Hawkins (2014)

rebelLed by a spunky, girly, and charismatic heroine, this book bends fantasy tropes to hilarious effect.

Recommended grade level: 8 and up

Pages: 345 (for ISBN 9780399256936)

Genre(s) and keywords: fantasy

Tone/Style: classy

Pace: moderate

Topics: secret organizations, supernatural powers, girl power, dating, love-hate relationships

Themes: destiny, romantic relationships

Summary: Harper Price, peerless Southern belle, was born ready for a Homecoming tiara. But after a strange run-in at the dance imbues her with incredible abilities, Harper’s destiny takes a turn for the seriously weird. She becomes a Paladin, one of an ancient line of guardians with agility, super strength and lethal fighting instincts. Just when life can’t get any more disastrously crazy, Harper finds out who she’s charged to protect: David Stark, school reporter, subject of a mysterious prophecy and possibly Harper’s least favorite person. But things get complicated when Harper starts falling for him–and discovers that David’s own fate could very well be to destroy Earth.

With snappy banter, cotillion dresses, non-stop action and a touch of magic, this new young adult series from bestseller Rachel Hawkins is going to make y’all beg for more. (Source)

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Programs for Middle Schoolers: Afterhours Laser Tag

The program I get most questions about from fellow library professionals is laser tag. This is by far my most well-attended program; I had 40 kids plus 10 on a wait list in 2016, and I had 55 in 2017. I continue to hear about it and get questions about when we’re doing it next all year long.

I’ve done this program twice, in February 2016 and February 2017. I chose February because it’s an indoor event that releases pent-up energy, so ideal for winter. Both times were for grades 6-8, and included four supervising adults. Parents were required to sign waivers.

What I share here will be a conflation of the two programs, taking the most effective parts of each. I’ll also mention some things I suggest not doing. Continue reading

Brief Hiatus and Summer Reading Booktalks

It’s been a month since my last post and it definitely has nothing to do with Persona 5. Nope. Definitely not.

Okay, so it IS pretty distracting when a game you’ve waited nine years for comes out, but honestly it was just in time to give me something to look forward to at the end of the day during a stressful few weeks. Last month I participated in Camp NaNoWriMo, then I had to unexpectedly find a new apartment and roommate. At the library, it’s summer reading booktalk time–I spent five full days booktalking at the middle schools! Plus there’s other summer reading prep and a newsletter deadline looming.

Aside from the newsletter deadline, things have settled down, but I’m pretty low on energy and motivation after all that. I’m going to take a week or two off before I resume regular posting.

In the meantime, here are some of my most successful booktalk books of this year’s summer reading school visits.

Mini Weapons of Mass Destruction by John Austin — all grades

I made a few of the projects in here and showed them off, which really got the kids’ attention. The teachers were good-humored about it…I think…

The Haunting of Sunshine Girl by Paige McKenzie — grades 6 and 7

I don’t know why they aren’t publishing more horror. The kids have a huge appetite for it. This one was written by a teenager and is based on her YouTube channel.

To Stay Alive: Mary Ann Graves and the Tragic Journey of the Donner Party by Skila Brown — all grades

I’ll be interested to see how many kids actually read this one, but it makes a GREAT booktalk. I suggest heavily implying the cannibalism part and then letting them figure it out themselves. The “ughhh!”s when the first few kids figure it out are very entertaining.

Being Jazz: My Life as a (Transgender) Teen by Jazz Jennings — grades 7 and 8

This one sparked a lot of interest and conversation. There were also several students who said they love Jazz. Unfortunately, a teacher and I had to tell off a few kids for snickering over this one, which was very disappointing. (It was actually more the teacher than me. I was trying to be subtle about it, but she WENT IN. She was a bamf.) This is a great book, and talking about it is a great way to help normalize LGBT lifestyles.

Every Falling Star: The True Story of How I Survived and Escaped North Korea by Sungju Lee — all grades

I was surprised and plIeased by the amount of interest in this one. It’s entertaining, educational, and eye-opening–a great book that has sort of flown under the radar so far.

I am a Genius of Unspeakable Evil and I Want to Be Your Class President by Josh Lieb — grades 6 and 7

The initial draw of this one was obviously the title. I started with just a booktalk, but ended up adding in an excerpt and showing one of the photos in the book, because I found I wasn’t able to adequately capture Oliver’s voice otherwise. I got mixed results when it came to audience laughter, but I’ve already had several kids at the library asking for it so it must have worked. Fair warning: this one’s surprisingly raunchy, considering the target audience.

A Night Divided by Jennifer Nielsen — grades 6 and 7

This is a super easy sell and addresses a little-covered part of history. It’s been making the rounds on the state award lists, too.

Ghost by Jason Reynolds — grades 6 and 7

This is short and about sports, so great for a lot of reluctant readers. Added bonus: it has an African-American protagonist, diverse cast, and urban setting. My community is sadly pretty homogeneous, so I’m always looking for good books to help them see the world from the points of view of Americans from different walks of life.

What books are you promoting for this summer?

The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon (2016)

Romance laced with social issues and philosophical musings.

Recommended grade level: mature 8th graders and up

Pages:   348 (for ISBN 9780553496680)

Genre(s) and keywords: romance, realistic, diverse

Tone/Style: contemplative

Pace: moderate

Topics: Asian-Americans, African-Americans (sort of; she is technically Jamaican), undocumented immigrants

Themes: love, romantic relationships, fate, chance, finding meaning, preparing for the future

Summary: Natasha: I’m a girl who believes in science and facts. Not fate. Not destiny. Or dreams that will never come true. I’m definitely not the kind of girl who meets a cute boy on a crowded New York City street and falls in love with him. Not when my family is twelve hours away from being deported to Jamaica. Falling in love with him won’t be my story. Continue reading

Fashion Rebels: Style Icons Who Changed the World Through Fashion by Carlyn Cerniglia Beccia (2016)

A celebration of women throughout history who had confidence in themselves and used style to make a difference.

Recommended grade level: 4 and up

Pages:  176 (for ISBN 9781582704876)

Genre(s) and keywords: nonfiction, reluctant readers

Tone/Style: informational, celebratory

Pace: fast

Topics: fashion, politics, celebrities, women’s rights

Themes: self-expression, confidence, being oneself

Summary: Throughout time, daring women have made fashion choices that have altered the course of history. From Marie Antoinette, who wore a hairstyle as large as her presence, to Coco Chanel, who imagined a world without rib crushing corsets and heavy gowns, to Katharine Hepburn, who walked around the studio in her underwear when studio executives refused to let her wear her then-scandalous jeans, these women were mavericks as well as rebellious icons. Continue reading

City of Saints and Thieves by Natalie C. Anderson (2017)

This mystery, set in Kenya and the Congo, packs an emotional and disturbing punch.

Recommended grade level: mature 8th graders and up

Pages:   401 (for ISBN 9780399547584)

Genre(s) and keywords: mystery, thriller, realistic, diverse, international, Africa (Kenya and the Congo)

Tone/Style: gritty

Pace: moderate

Topics: murder, investigations, refugees

Themes: family, trust, revenge, traumatic family history

Summary: In the shadows of Sangui City, there lives a girl who doesn’t exist. After fleeing the Congo as refugees, Tina and her mother arrived in Kenya looking for the chance to build a new life and home. Her mother quickly found work as a maid for a prominent family, headed by Roland Greyhill, one of the city’s most respected business leaders. But Tina soon learns that the Greyhill fortune was made from a life of corruption and crime. So when her mother is found shot to death in Mr. Greyhill’s personal study, she knows exactly who’s behind it. Continue reading

Comparative Religion: Investigate the World Through Religious Tradition by Carla Mooney (2015)

comparativeAn introduction to the world’s 5 largest religions: Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam.

Recommended grade level: 4-8

Pages:  128 (for ISBN 9781619303058)

Genre(s) and keywords: nonfiction

Tone/Style: informational

Pace: fast

Topics: religion, religious conflict, coexistence, Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, Islam

Themes: moral codes, God/gods, the purpose of existence, the origins of the universe

Summary: Over 7 billion people live on the earth, and 84 percent of them describe themselves as being religious. What does that mean? Few topics incite such passion as religion. Why are humans invested in ideas that may never be proved? Why has religion played such an important role in history? Continue reading