Counting by 7s by Holly Goldberg Sloan (2013)

counting

This sad and thoughtful book has enjoyed great popularity in the last few years.

Recommended grade level: 4-7

Pages: 380 (for ISBN 9780803738553)

Genre(s) and keywords: realistic fiction, diverse, African-American protagonist

Tone/Style: precise, melancholy

Pace: leisurely

Topics: orphans, gifted students, surrogate families

Themes: grief and loss, being different, finding family, moving on

Summary: Counting By 7s is the story of Willow Chance, a twelve-year old girl who has been identified at an early age as ‘gifted’. Willow lives in Bakersfield, California and comes home from school one day to the news that her parents have been killed in a traffic accident. Continue reading

Michael Vey: The Prisoner of Cell 25 by Richard Paul Evans (2011)

prisoner

This sci-fi/action story is one of the most popular books among middle schoolers at my library.

Recommended grade level: 6-10

Pages: 326 (for ISBN 9781451656503)

Genre(s) and keywords: action, science fiction

Tone/Style: mysterious, exciting

Pace: moderate to fast

Topics: powers (supernatural), fitting in, rescue, escape

Themes: parent/child relationships, friendship, being different, young people being used by adults

Summary: To everyone at Meridian High School, fourteen-year-old Michael Vey is nothing special, just the kid who has Tourette’s syndrome. But in truth, Michael is extremely special—he has electric powers. Continue reading

Wonder by R.J. Palacio (2012)

Wonder_Cover_ArtHere’s a book that needs no introduction.

Recommended grade level: 4-8 (younger is fine for kids who are reading up)

Pages: 320 (for ISBN 9780375869020)

Genre(s) and keywords: realistic fiction, Kylie’s favorites

Tone/Style: hopeful, personal

Pace: moderate

Topics: facial differences, new schools, making friends, fitting in, overcoming bullies

Themes: being different, familybetrayal by friends, perseverance, trying something new

Summary: August (Auggie) Pullman was born with a facial deformity that prevented him from going to a mainstream school—until now. Continue reading